Infant Teething

An infant teething in pain

Infant teething is a rough process for everyone – babies and parents alike. Some babies’ teeth erupt with no problems at all but for others (most, it seems), teething can be a long, drawn out, and painful process. Hopefully, for your little one, it’s not too rough, but just in case, read on.

Besides giving your child plenty of tender loving care, there are a few things you can do to care for your child’s mouth during the teething phase.

Take Notice Of Teething Signs And Symptoms

When your little one starts teething, which may take place at any age (some children are even born with 1 or 2 teeth!), it’s normal for them to be fussy and irritable. Some common symptoms seen with teething are difficulty sleeping, decrease in appetite and increased drooling. It’s also normal for their temperature to increase slightly during infant teething, however, high-grade fevers are not normal. If your child seems overly cranky or has a high fever, call your physician.

When teething begins is different for each child. While the average time teeth begin to appear is around 4 to 6 months, teething can begin anywhere between three and 12 months.

You Can Keep Your Child Comfortable With These Tips

Your baby may seem inconsolable while teething but here are some things you can do to soothe and ease their pain:

  • Massage their gums. The counter pressure of your finger helps ease teething pain.
  • Use teething rings or toys. Even a simple chilled washcloth will work. Chewing soothes the baby as counter pressure relieves pain. When chilling toys or rings, remember to refrigerate instead of freeze.
  • Relieve pain. Talk to your child’s doctor about pain relief if your little one seems to be having a more difficult time. Appropriate dosage of acetaminophen may be beneficial during especially painful teething episodes. Avoid teething medications that contain the pain reliever benzocaine.

And when times get especially tough for your baby who is in the thick of teething, just remember what an important milestone it is. Teething, like crawling, walking, and talking, shows that your child is on the right track developmentally.

Even Before Teeth Appear, Take Good (Correct) Care Of Them

The American Dental Association recommends taking your child to the dentist as soon as the first tooth appears and no later than their first birthday. You can also begin brushing before your child’s first tooth appears. Using a soft-bristled toothbrush, start brushing your child’s gums twice a day (this pressure will feel great for children suffering through the teething process!). Avoid toothpaste until the first tooth appears. Since very young children have not yet learned not to swallow toothpaste, use only a smear of fluoridated toothpaste or the size of a grain of rice.

We’re Here To Help Any Time You Need

Good oral care starts from the minute your child is born. We’re here to help you every step of the way! If you have any questions concerning infant oral health care or infant teething, contact us or make an appointment with us today. Baby teeth may be small but they’re important!

We can’t wait to see your little one’s sweet smile!

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